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John J. Poe

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

At the age of 63, John died unexpectedly on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, in Colorado Springs, Colo.  He was born in Albuquerque, N.M., and lived in Woodinville from 1984 to 2010. John retired Honeywell Corp. in 2009, and since August 2010 he and his wife, Patti, have been traveling full time in their RV.

In addition to his wife, John is survived by his son, Brian Sandenaw; daughter, Valerie Paschen and husband Jason; granddaughter, Layla Sandenaw and sister Mary Burchett and husband Warren.

Services will be held Saturday, October 29, 2011, at 2 p.m. at Canyon Hills Community Church, 22027 17th Ave SE, Bothell, WA.

Annie Irene Roney

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Obit RoneyAnnie Irene Roney (known to most as Irene Roney, grandma, nana and great-great grandma) was born on her grandfather’s homestead October 7, 1911, to Evelyn Mae Reekie and Russell Drew Wintamute in Dodge City, Kan., where she graduated in 1929 from Dodge City High School.

After high school, she went to work at Gwinner’s Confectionary and Café.  For the rest of her life, food was her vocation.

On May 18, 1931, she married Dowling Parker Patison and had one daughter.

In 1937, Irene Patison and her daughter moved to Seattle, Wash.

She learned about restaurant management at Washington State University and was a master food preserver.

During World War II, she worked for sorority and fraternity houses on the University of Washington campus.

When school was out for the summer, she cooked for children’s camps and spent summers as a cook for gold mining camps in Alaska.  She ended her working career at the Ben Paris Restaurant in the heart of Seattle.

In 1942, Irene met John Clark Roney and they married in 1950.

They bought their first piece of property in Sequim and made this their home for 60 years.

Irene was a past Honorary Grand Pioneer Queen, president of P.E.O. Chapter F.Y., Matron of Armistice Court Oder of Amaranth, volunteer at the senior center, and active in helping organize the Sequim Chamber of Commerce.

She was a member of the Trinity United Methodist Church.

Irene loved making quilts for the Trinity Quilters, continuing to help others in need her entire life.

Irene was known for her love of cooking. Feeding all her family and friends is what she lived for.

Her dinners, pies, cookies, cakes and canned goods were just some of many items that she shared with everyone.  She hoped people would come hungry and leave full.

She always sent her grandchildren home with their “food survival kit.”

Irene’s family surrounded her with love   —  grandchildren, Teri and Jay Engelbrecht; great grandchildren, Bradley (BJ) and Kjersti Engelbrecht, Jason Engelbrecht, Katie Engelbrecht, Cristina and Matt Waters and her great-great grandchild 16- month-old Madisyn Grace Engelbrecht.

In honor of what would have been her 100th birthday on October 7, 2011, family and friends celebrated her life October 16  at the Trinity United Methodist Church in Sequim.

The Woodinville Weekly apologizes for the error that prevented Irene Roney’s obituary from running prior to the celebration of her life.

Glen Horton

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Obit HortonGlen Horton, 83, of Carnation, passed away October 12, 2011.

Glen was born on May 22, 1928,  in southwest Colorado.

Glen was raised by his coal mining parents ranching and enjoying outdoor recreational activities.

After a move to Washington, he graduated from Bremerton High School.

Around the start of World War II, he went to work at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard as an electrician.

He left there for a stint in the army and served as part of the occupation forces in Japan.

After leaving the service he returned to the shipyard as a draftsman.

During that time the avid fisherman met and married the catch of his life, Eileen Kearney, in 1951.

Glen and Eileen had three children: Jo Marie, Jim and Nancy.

In 1956 they moved to Los Alamos, N.M., where Glen went to work at the lab, rising to the position of senior designer in the electrical division.

Ultimately, they lived there for 40+ years.

During that time he raised a family, hunted, fished and perfected his margarita recipe.  He also enjoyed international travel and worked on lots of woodworking projects.

After retirement, he returned to Washington in 1999 and settled east of Seattle in Carnation, Wash.

During his later years he spent his time fishing, gardening and doing yard work, welcoming visitors and fretting about the Mariners.

Glen is survived by his immediate family, including daughter-in-law Joyce Horton; son-in-law Mike Hoyt  and three grandchildren Tim Horton, and Bryce and Gerilyn Hoyt.

A funeral mass will be held on Saturday, October 22  at 11 a.m., at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church in Carnation.

In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Children’s Hospital in Seattle, or to the charity of your choice.

Full obituary and online guestbook at WWW.FLINTOFTS.COM.

Irene Roney

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

In Celebration of the Life of Irene Roney:

rooneyAnnie Irene Roney (known to most as Irene Roney, Grandma, Nana and Great-Great Grandma) was born on her grandfather’s homestead October 7, 1911 to Evelyn Mae Reekie and Russell Drew Wintamute in Dodge City, Kansas where she graduated in 1929 from Dodge City High School.  After high school, she went to work at Gwinner’s Confectionary and Café.  For the rest of her life, food was her vocation.

On May 18, 1931, she married Dowling Parker Patison and had one daughter.

In 1937, Irene Patison and her daughter moved to Seattle, Washington.  She learned about restaurant management at Washington State University and was a Master Food Preserver.  During WWII, she worked for sorority and fraternity houses on the University of Washington campus.  When school was out for the summer, she cooked for children’s camps and spent summers as a cook for gold mining camps in Alaska.  She ended her working career at the Ben Paris Restaurant in the heart of Seattle.

In 1942, Irene met John Clark Roney and they married in 1950.  They bought their first piece of property in Sequim and made this their home for 60 years.  Irene was a past Honorary Grand Pioneer Queen, president of P.E.O. Chapter F.Y., Matron of Armistice Court Oder of Amaranth, volunteer at the Senior Center, and active in helping organize the Sequim Chamber of Commerce.  She was a member of the Trinity United Methodist Church.  Irene loved making quilts for the Trinity Quilters, continuing to help others in need her entire life.

Irene was known for her love of cooking.  Feeding all her family and friends is what she lived for.  Her dinners, pies, cookies, cakes, and canned goods were just some of many items that she shared with everyone.  She hoped people would always come hungry and leave full.  She always sent her grandchildren home with their “food survival kit”.

Irene’s family surrounded her with love; Grandchildren, Teri & Jay Engelbrecht; Great Grandchildren, Bradley (BJ) & Kjersti Engelbrecht, Jason Engelbrecht, Katie Engelbrecht, Cristina & Matt Waters and her Great-Great Grandchild, 16 month old, Madisyn Grace Engelbrecht.

In honor of what would have been her 100th birthday on October 7, 2011, we welcome all to celebrate her life, on Sunday, October 16, 2011 at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 S. Blake Ave, Sequim from 12:00pm – 1:00pm following the traditional church service at 11:00am.

Christopher Herbert Taylor

  • Written by Valley View Staff

Taylor_obitChristopher Herbert Taylor, born 12-10-56, passed away on 09-10-11 of a heart attack in his Duvall home of over 20 yrs.

Christopher was a Redmond High graduate, grew up visiting Mimi & Pops (grandparents)  home, in Monroe that was featured in Home Beautiful in the 1960’s as a state of the art designs.

Christopher continued into the Army, serving under President Bush during the Gulf War and attending Ft Steilacoom College and BCC for a business and psychology degree. Then went into partnership in Maxie’s – Frosty’s Restaurant in Juanita for 18 years with his father, Max Taylor. Then continued as a teamster for Budweiser distributorship in the PNW for another 10 years.

He owned a company that was licensed to design and manufacture custom University of Washington crystal gifts. He designed the 2001 Rose Bowl crystal piece given to the famous artist, Michael Reagan, for his support of the Huskies. Both Christopher and his wife are friends of the Michael Reagan projects and supported and helped the Husky programs whenever possible. He was a Husky football season ticket holder for over 30 years.

Christopher loved life by snow skiing in competitions and for pleasure in U.S. and abroad. He water skied, liked boating on Lake Chelan, riding horses, golfing, supporting the Special Olympics programs and loved to ride motorcycles.

His favorite times were with his wife and two dogs, Laurie, Jerico and Deogie – the loves of his life. He loved to coach and umpire for his son Steven’s baseball teams and was a supporter of Steven’s football, wrestling and basketball teams.

Christopher was an avid fan of the Seahawks, Sonics and Mariners professional teams, attending events and getting into the photo taking whenever possible with coaches and team members.

Christopher loved music from the old rock n roll days, attending concerts and playing music whenever driving in the countryside. He would see someone looking down or low and offer a hug to help lift their day. He made a point of loving everyone he came across.

He is survived by his wife, Laurie, his son Steven Christopher, his two brothers Mike and Curt Taylor with many cousins, nieces and nephews.

Burial services were Sept. 30 at the Tahoma National Cemetery.  A church service was held Oct. 1 at the Tolt Congregational Church of Christ in Carnation.

Laurie will continue Christopher’s legacy through education of others and her horse business. Visit her Web site www.TaylorMadeHorses.com.