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Zero Waste Partnership WM & Woodinville Chamber

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff
“Thank you for making tonight a zero-waste event! What a cool way to make a difference in our community..thank you for your support.”   
– Kimberly Ellertson, Director of Marketing Woodinville Chamber and Visitor Center
 
A unique partnership between two organizations committed to sustainability – the Woodinville Chamber of Commerce and Waste Management – has resulted in the transformation of one of the Chamber’s prominent annual events. Waste Management and the Woodinville Chamber worked together to transform the annual Dinner & Auction into a sustainable event in which almost all waste was either recycled, composted, reused, or prevented. 
 
The Chamber made the following sustainable decisions to ensure as little waste as possible.    
 
Tablecloths Plastic or cloth - Cloth -  Zero Waste
Table Centerpiece Single-use or Reusable Item - Reusable Auction Item - Zero Waste
Utensils Plastic or Silverware - Silverware - Zero Waste
Cups Paper, Plastic, or Glass - Glass - Zero Waste 
Plates Paper or Ceramic - Ceramic -Zero Waste 
Dinner Napkins  Paper or Cloth - Cloth - Zero Waste
 
Materials that could not be reused were either recycled or composted, and therefore diverted from a landfill. Any food leftover on guests’ plates and paper dessert napkins were placed in the compost bin to be turned into a soil amendment. Paper programs left at the end of the night were recycled, along with all the empty bottles and cans.
 
Prior to the event, Waste Management delivered compost and recycling bins at the Columbia Winery for use at the Woodinville Dinner & Auction. Compost bins were clearly labeled and placed next to the kitchen sink to ensure food scraps could be composted with ease. WM Education staff met with catering staff day-of to ensure the team knew which materials to compost and recycle. Although wine corks are not a material accepted in traditional curb- side recycling, corks from this event were able to be diverted from the landfill. Wine corks were collected and saved in a specified bucket, and then taken to a ReCork drop-off location to be grinded down and made into new items.

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