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Local Immigration Policy is Based on Individual Safety

  • Written by David B. Clark
Living in Trump’s America was proceeded with a largely hyperbolic promise of the building of a massive wall stretching across the US/Mexico border. Many thought this was a laughable solution to a problem that is layered in the bedrock of the American Dream, freedom, and happiness. Now what seemed farfetched is gaining momentum. Immigration is a very complex issue that cannot be solved or stopped by erecting a backstop between us and our neighbor to the south. The rise that some U.S. citizens feel when the number of just how many of their good, red-white-and-blue blooded American dollars stack to help fund someone that does not have legal authority to be on U.S. soil is justified. Justification insofar as only their personal experience. The safety and security of any person remains paramount regardless of their immigration status.
 
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DSHS continues work to combat opioid crisis with launch of “Starts with One” campaign

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff
Editor's Note:  In the past two weeks, I received a few emails and a few more handwritten letters from students urging The Woodinville Weekly to consider writing a story about drug abuse in our community and what (if anything) is being done to draw attention to and more importantly help to solve the problem. 

I'd like to THANK these students for standing up and reaching out to us.  It takes a lot of courage to call attention to difficult issues in our community and in our schools.
 
We are happy to report that Governor Jay Inslee and the Washington State Department of Social and Health (DSHS) have not only addressed the problem in our communities but they are working towards solutions.
Please see the press release that follows outlining a new DSHS program that is another step in the war to combat opioid addiction. Again - thank you students!
 
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According to recent statistics, prescription pain medications are now the leading cause of accidental death in Washington state – more than guns or car crashes. In 2015, an average of two Washingtonians died each day from opioid overdose, and heroin deaths more than doubled between the years 2010 and 2015.
 
Now, using a portion of an $11 million federal grant, the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is continuing its work to combat the state’s opioid epidemic by launching a new prevention campaign, “Starts with One.”
“This campaign is an important component of a larger prevention and treatment strategy to combat the opioid use disorder epidemic gripping our state,” said Chris Imhoff, Director of the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery.
 
“We all have critical roles in addressing the opioid crisis,” said Governor Jay Inslee. “Together we can improve the health of our communities by taking preventative steps in our homes and communities today as well as supporting loved ones who are seeking treatment and recovery.”
 
The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) received the grant in spring 2017. Provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the grant not only assists in implementing a statewide response plan, it also helps address key elements in Governor Jay Inslee’s Executive Order issued in October 2016 to fight the opioid crisis. In his order, Inslee expressed it was imperative that the state act in a comprehensive manner to address this public health crisis.
 
DSHS launched the campaign earlier this month, focusing on the premise that every Washingtonian can play a role in preventing opioid abuse. 
 
The themes used in this multi-media campaign are “one act of kindness,” “one honest conversation” and “one simple step,” all of which are paired with specific actions people can take:
 
Young adults can share the facts of opioid abuse with their peers and talk with health care providers about other options for pain management when prescribed an opioid;
 
Parents can speak to their kids about the risks of opioids and tips on how to lock up or dispose of medications; and
 
Older adults and parents are encouraged to lock up and dispose of medications safely.
 
Learn more about the campaign and download materials at GetTheFactsRx.com. If you or a loved one has a substance use disorder and need help, please call the Washington Recovery Help Line at any time for free, confidential and
emotional support as well as crisis intervention and referrals at 1-866-789-1511.
  

DSHS continues work to combat opioid crisis with launch of “Starts with One” campaign

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff
Editor's Note:  In the past two weeks, I received a few emails and a few more handwritten letters from students urging The Woodinville Weekly to consider writing a story about drug abuse in our community and what (if anything) is being done to draw attention to and more importantly help to solve the problem. 

I'd like to THANK these students for standing up and reaching out to us.  It takes a lot of courage to call attention to difficult issues in our community and in our schools.
 
We are happy to report that Governor Jay Inslee and the Washington State Department of Social and Health (DSHS) have not only addressed the problem in our communities but they are working towards solutions.
Please see the press release that follows outlining a new DSHS program that is another step in the war to combat opioid addiction. Again - thank you students!
 
____________________________________________________________
 
According to recent statistics, prescription pain medications are now the leading cause of accidental death in Washington state – more than guns or car crashes. In 2015, an average of two Washingtonians died each day from opioid overdose, and heroin deaths more than doubled between the years 2010 and 2015.
 
Now, using a portion of an $11 million federal grant, the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is continuing its work to combat the state’s opioid epidemic by launching a new prevention campaign, “Starts with One.”
“This campaign is an important component of a larger prevention and treatment strategy to combat the opioid use disorder epidemic gripping our state,” said Chris Imhoff, Director of the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery.
 
“We all have critical roles in addressing the opioid crisis,” said Governor Jay Inslee. “Together we can improve the health of our communities by taking preventative steps in our homes and communities today as well as supporting loved ones who are seeking treatment and recovery.”
 
The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) received the grant in spring 2017. Provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the grant not only assists in implementing a statewide response plan, it also helps address key elements in Governor Jay Inslee’s Executive Order issued in October 2016 to fight the opioid crisis. In his order, Inslee expressed it was imperative that the state act in a comprehensive manner to address this public health crisis.
 
DSHS launched the campaign earlier this month, focusing on the premise that every Washingtonian can play a role in preventing opioid abuse. 
 
The themes used in this multi-media campaign are “one act of kindness,” “one honest conversation” and “one simple step,” all of which are paired with specific actions people can take:
 
Young adults can share the facts of opioid abuse with their peers and talk with health care providers about other options for pain management when prescribed an opioid;
 
Parents can speak to their kids about the risks of opioids and tips on how to lock up or dispose of medications; and
 
Older adults and parents are encouraged to lock up and dispose of medications safely.
 
Learn more about the campaign and download materials at GetTheFactsRx.com. If you or a loved one has a substance use disorder and need help, please call the Washington Recovery Help Line at any time for free, confidential and
emotional support as well as crisis intervention and referrals at 1-866-789-1511.
  

21 Acres Manager Earns Green Building Recognition

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff

Melissa Sokolowsky, 21 Acres’ Facility Manager, has joined an elite group of the world’s top sustainable building professionals, earning her LEED Green Associate credential from the United State Green Building Council (USGBC). LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is a rating system developed by the USGBC to evaluate the environmental performance of a building and encourage market transformation toward sustainable design. The 21 Acres Center, located on the campus in Woodinville, is a LEED Platinum certified building, the highest awarded through USGBC.

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How to Live With Climate Change

  • Written by Woodinville Weekly Staff
The climate crisis has affected all of the country and the world. In order to understand better what it means and how to adjust to changes, Northshore Senior Center has formed a sustainability program which will offer recycling and climate related information to benefit the entire community.
 
On January 25th, Jeanine SanClemente, a participant in Al Gore’s Climate Reality Project, will talk about “Climate Change: How will It Affect Washington and What Can I Do?” at 10:15 a.m. at the Northshore Senior Center, 10201 East Riverside Drive, Bothell. This will be a great opportunity to learn about the changes we are experiencing and find ways to help ourselves and our neighbors. Everyone is welcome.
 
For more information, call the center at 425-487-2441.

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